Category Archives: Interesting Places

Volcano

Stanley and the Volcano

Here’s Stanley at the volcano then dancing with  Hula Girls  – dressed in tuxedo attending my daughter Keryl’s wedding  –  then with Kids from my class who got a surprise trip to Florida – the mom  called and asked for a Stanley  –  I dressed  him in Florida wear,  rolled him up and sent him off Wallpaper style.  He visited with Mickey just days later  — then the last picture with Zachary in   matching Johnny. Stanley  stayed with him at Hasbro Children’s Hospital  everytime he was undergoing chemo treatment.
Mary Vaillancourt
Park School
Warwick, Rhode Island


(and as Best Man)

UN Peacekeepers

Greetings from a fan of Flat Stanley

I was introduced to Flat Stanley in 1999 while serving with the United Nations International Police Task Force in Bosnia. My family was visiting me during the Christmas holiday and my twelve year old son introduced me to Flat Stanley. From there Stanley became a part of my family after my family returned home. In fact, he was adopted by my international staff and the adventure begun.

First, we officially made him an honorary International Police Task Force officer, pinning a badge and donning a blue peacekeeping beret on him. Once receiving the honors bestowed on him, he traveled with me and my staff of peacekeepers all over the world. He went proudly wearing the beret and badge to exotic places like: Nepal, India, Egypt, Greece, Kenya, Iceland and many other places.

Along the way he met ambassadors, police officers and families of my staff. Everywhere he went he was loved and we took lots of digital pictures.

After he returned back to Bosnia from each his adventures, I would send an email to my son’s teacher and class, a little story of his trip. I would include a little about the culture, the people he met and, of course, the pictures.

Mrs. Kasson, my son’s teacher, invited me and Flat Stanley to her class before the school year was out. There, I returned Flat Stanley and showed a Power Point presentation of all of his travels as a good will ambassador.

In closing, my youngest son is now in 6th grade and I’m about to depart on another International Peacekeeping Mission, to Iraq. I hope that my son’s school adopts the Flat Stanley project so I can use him, as I did in Bosnia, as an ambassador of goodwill and peace.

Very truly yours,

Harry J. Gillway


Chief of Police
Kearny Police Department
Police Advisory Mission to Iraq
U.S. Department of State

Hi Dale,

Here are a few more of FS with some peacekeepers in other countries.

I have way too many pictures with Flat to share now.  He was a great travel companion for me and friends.  I alone, traveled to Greece, Germany, The Netherlands, Egypt, Israel and Croatia with him.  With my mission to Iraq, I hope to perhaps get schools there involved with Flat Stanley in an exchange with American children.  I firmly believe that once educated to the cultural diversities and respecting those differences, people won’t be as quick to hate one another.  The best way to do that is follow the laws of primacy with children “Those things first taught are most remembered”, Flat Stanley is a great ice breaker to help others (especially children) to know us better.

In Egypt with an Egyptian Police Officer

With Princess Nas in Pakistan

With a Peace Keeper in Mystras, Greece.

In Hungary with Hungarian Police

My friend, it’s been an honor to email you and be involved in your wonderful Flat Stanley Project.

Yours truly,

Harry J. Gillway


Greetings from a fan of Flat Stanley

I was introduced to Flat Stanley in 1999 while serving with the United Nations International Police Task Force in Bosnia. My family was visiting me during the Christmas holiday and my twelve year old son introduced me to Flat Stanley. From there Stanley became a part of my family after my family returned home. In fact, he was adopted by my international staff and the adventure begun.

First, we officially made him an honorary International Police Task Force officer, pinning a badge and donning a blue peacekeeping beret on him. Once receiving the honors bestowed on him, he traveled with me and my staff of peacekeepers all over the world. He went proudly wearing the beret and badge to exotic places like: Nepal, India, Egypt, Greece, Kenya, Iceland and many other places.

Along the way he met ambassadors, police officers and families of my staff. Everywhere he went he was loved and we took lots of digital pictures.

After he returned back to Bosnia from each his adventures, I would send an email to my son’s teacher and class, a little story of his trip. I would include a little about the culture, the people he met and, of course, the pictures.

Mrs. Kasson, my son’s teacher, invited me and Flat Stanley to her class before the school year was out. There, I returned Flat Stanley and showed a Power Point presentation of all of his travels as a good will ambassador.

In closing, my youngest son is now in 6th grade and I’m about to depart on another International Peacekeeping Mission, to Iraq. I hope that my son’s school adopts the Flat Stanley project so I can use him, as I did in Bosnia, as an ambassador of goodwill and peace.

Very truly yours,

Harry J. Gillway


Chief of Police
Kearny Police Department
Police Advisory Mission to Iraq
U.S. Department of State

Hi Dale,

Here are a few more of FS with some peacekeepers in other countries.

I have way too many pictures with Flat to share now.  He was a great travel companion for me and friends.  I alone, traveled to Greece, Germany, The Netherlands, Egypt, Israel and Croatia with him.  With my mission to Iraq, I hope to perhaps get schools there involved with Flat Stanley in an exchange with American children.  I firmly believe that once educated to the cultural diversities and respecting those differences, people won’t be as quick to hate one another.  The best way to do that is follow the laws of primacy with children “Those things first taught are most remembered”, Flat Stanley is a great ice breaker to help others (especially children) to know us better.

In Egypt with an Egyptian Police Officer

With Princess Nas in Pakistan

With a Peace Keeper in Mystras, Greece.

In Hungary with Hungarian Police

My friend, it’s been an honor to email you and be involved in your wonderful Flat Stanley Project.

Yours truly,

Harry J. Gillway


Tibet

Just when I think Stanley has been everywhere, someone sends me something special.  Here’s Stanley in Tibet!
Special thanks to Julie Rice for taking Stanley backpacking in Tibet.  Thank you, Kathy Rayhill, a teacher in South Dakota,  for asking Julie to take him.  These are great pictures!

Here he is on a yak.

Here is with an ancient terra cotta statue

Tibetan boys and Flat Stanley

Taipei, Taiwan

Flat Stanley in Taipei, Taiwan

Dear Mr. Hubert,

I saw a photo on CNN .com of Flat Stanley with Clint Eastwood at the Oscars and it prompted me to do a little Flat Stanley research.  I found you and your website.  Let me say,  I think the Flat Stanley Project is one of the best things I have ever seen to motivate kids not only to read but to be aware of the cultures in other countries and even other regions within our own country.

When my oldest son was in 3rd grade he did the project, too.  We lived in Wisconsin at the time and sent Flat Stanley to some friends in Arizona, where my son was born.  They had Stanley for about a month and all they sent back with him was two printed pages from a website.  We were so disappointed and I vowed that if anyone ever sent me a Flat Stanley I would show him the royal treatment!  We had such fun with ours that my 5 year old was constantly reminding me to not forget Stanley whenever we would leave the house (even though I already had him packed and ready to go).

I read that one of the things you’d like to do next is introduce Stanley to Asia where children both eastern and western would learn about each others cultures firsthand from each other.  We are planning on living in Taiwan until July of 2006 but if I can be of any assistance to you in getting things started over here, let me know.  I volunteer on a daily basis at Taipei American School.


Flat Stanley arrives at Taipei American School


Trick or Treating in my new Chinese pajama costume


Giant tree frogs- OH NO!


Hanging out with the bats in a Taroko cave


Reading my favourite story with my new friend, Stanley, from Texas

A huge Stanley fan,

Mary Downs

Stockholm, Sweden

Stockholm, Sweden

My daughter participated in the Flat Stanley project. She sent her Flat Stanley to her uncle in Stockholm, Sweden. Flat Stanley came back with lots of pictures and postcards explaining his recent adventure. He travelled the farthest in her class. The kids were able to learn about Swedish culture, food, history, and geography. Here is a picture of FS from Stockholm.

Thanks for such a wonderful idea,

Bryan

Shea Stadium

Dear Dale,
My husband Tim had the opportunity to take batting practice at Shea Stadium in New York during September of 2003. He generously agreed to bring along one of the Flat Stanleys my 3rd grade class (from the John F. Kennedy School in Great Neck, New York) created.
Not only did Stanley get to spend time on the field and in the dugout, but while there, Tim had the opportunity to meet Chevy Chase.  Mr. Chase agreed to pose with Stanley on the playing field at Shea.  So, I have attached the five pictures of Stanley at Shea Stadium and one of him with Chevy Chase.  I hope you enjoy them!
Thank you!
Lori Paul

With Timo Perez’s batting helmet

Scotland

 

Flat Stanley Visited Scotland

dale-personalimage
Submitted by Dale Hubert
 
DSCN0716Flat Stanley stayed in the fishing village of Pittenweem.
He stayed at the Giles House.  It was a lovely old building with a spiral stone staircase.DSCN0719
 
 
There was beautiful scenery everywhere.DSCN0276
This old mill was used to pump water into the salt basins.  Then the basins were heated and the water would evaporate, leaving the salt behind.DSCN0416
 
 
There were castles all over the place!
This is Stirling Castle.  Most of Stirling Castle dates back to the 100 year period between 1496 and 1583.  The Castle provided a home for Scottish Kings and Queens from the days of Alexander I (and probably earlier) until the Union of the Scottish and English Crowns under James VI. Even in Roman times there was a fortress on this site.DSCN0050
This is what the kitchen of a castle would have looked like.  Flat Stanley was helping make bread.DSCN0059
 
 
DSCN0065The Stirling Castle tour guide posed with Flat Stanley.
Flat Stanley liked the pictures of the Highland Cattle.DSCN0076
 
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Sir William Wallace (1267-1305) was a Scottish hero. In 1296, Edward I of England invaded Scotland and the Scottish Wars of Independence began. William Wallace began a guerrilla campaign against the English. On September 11, 1297, the Scots defeated the English army at the Battle of Stirling Bridge.
After defeat at the Battle of Falkirk in 1298, Wallace was betrayed and captured.
Wallace was also called Braveheart.
This is the view from the tower of the Wallace Monument.  It is 220 feet (67m) high and was opened in 1869.
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There are 246 steps and Flat Stanley was pretty much worn out by the time he reached the top.  But the view was worth it!
This is a statue of Wallace.  Flat Stanley thought it looked quite a bit like Mel Gibson.
That’s the tower of the Wallace Monument in the background.
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Can you guess what this is?  Yes, it’s a Medieval toilet.  Ever wonder why kings and queens had so many castles and spent so much time travelling?  Well, one of the reasons was that after a couple of months at a castle the place would get stinky and they’d move on.
The toilet room was called the garderobe.  The hole was often placed above a stream.  People used to hang their clothes in the garderobe so the odour would keep moths away.  This was called a wardrobe.
Flat Stanley visited the lesser known Balgonie Castle.  It was a wonderful place and the Laird of Balgonie castle himself gave him a tour.
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Not too long ago there was a tax law that made people pay taxes on all livable structures on their property.  The definition of a livable structure was if it had a roof.  So, in order to save money on taxes, people smashed in the roofs of these ancient buildings.  That caused them to deteriorate very quickly.  The Laird of Balgonie Castle and his wife, the Lady of Balgonie Castle, are restoring this ancient dwelling.  Many people travel here to get married in the Medieval church within the castle.
Flat Stanley sailed to the nearby Isle of May.  He saw puffins and eiders and thousands of gulls.
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They are hard to see, but behind Flat Stanley are many thousands of birds nesting on the rocks.
The puffins nest in burrows.
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This female eider is on a nest.  Because it so cold where the eiders live, they grow feathers that are especially warm.  People use the down feathers from the eider to make eider down insulated clothing.
Unfortunately, much of Scotland’s history involved wars.  The Catholics and Protestants fought against each other even though they were both Christians.  This is the remains of St Andrews Cathedral.  It was built in 1160 and consecrated in 1318 in the presence of Robert the Bruce.
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St Andrews Cathedral was by far the largest cathedral in Scotland and one of the longest in Britain.  It was 109 metres (357 feet) long!
What happened to it?  John Knox, the famous Scottish leader of the Reformation gave a particularly stirring speech at another church and his congregation marched to St Andrews Cathedral and destroyed it.
This figure represents Cardinal David Beaton.  He was part of the bloody history of St Andrews.  In 1528 the Cardinal had John Wishart burned at the stake for preaching the Protestant faith rather than the Roman Catholic.  Wishart wasn’t the only one to be burned at the stake, but shortly after his death Cardinal Beaton was murdered in revenge.
John Knox was considered to be a supporter of the murder, so he was sent away to work on a French prison galley ship for two years.  After he returned he gave the fiery speech that resulted in the destruction of the cathedral.
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Although it is now a ruin and most of the rubble was taken by townspeople to construct other buildings, one of the towers remains standing.  Flat Stanley had a wonderful view from the top.
This is the tower he climbed.
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These medals are from the Bishops of St Andrews.
This was the basement of the cathedral.  It has a barrel-vaulted ceiling and is a wonderful example of Medieval architecture.
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Of course, not everything in Scotland had to do with war and fighting.  There were lovely gardens and wonderful people.  Flat Stanley is posing with an artist.
If you are ever in Scotland and want to visit one the best tea-houses, go to the Loganlea Restaurant in Forestmill, Clackmannanshire.
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The oldest tennis court in continuous use is at Falkland Castle.  Mary Queen of Scots played here.
Of course, kings and queens didn’t bother bending down to pick up the tennis balls, so their servants did that and put the ball into play.  That’s where the word “serve” came from in tennis – from the servant starting the game.
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Flat Stanley had never seen a Toad Crossing sign before.
(He didn’t see any toads, either.)
Oh, oh- back to the scary history of Scotland.  This didn’t happen in Medieval times, though.  This was from the 1950s and 1960s.  This is Scotland’s Secret Bunker.  http://www.secretbunker.co.uk/
On the outside it looks like an ordinary farmhouse (except for the solid steel shutters) but underneath it is a tunnel and a command centre.
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This corridor leads down to the area that can withstand a nuclear bomb.
It used to be a very secret place and has only recently been opened to the public.DSCN0694
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BBC Radio was all ready to take to the airwaves to tell the people what to do in case of a nuclear attack.
And to play soothing music as the bombs fell.
There was a radar centre.
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And beds for those who were allowed to go into the bunker.
Have you ever read, “Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes?”  Children in Japan sent one thousand paper cranes to the Underground Bunker in a prayer for peace in the hopes that nuclear weapons would never be used against people again.
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Ahh!  It’s an Eagle Owl!  Do they eat Flat Stanleys?
Fortunately, it was very well-trained.
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Before the Scots lived in Scotland there was a group of people called the Picts.  Not much remains of them, except for the Pictish stones.
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The Picts carved mysterious shapes in stones and stood them up in fields.  These are preserved in a museum.
The stone on the right was not carved by the Picts.  It was carved by the Vikings.
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The Picts used the shape of the cross even before they converted to Christianity.
There are still Pictish stones standing in fields.  The farmers simply plough around them.
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This carving is more than one thousand years old!  The Picts battled with the Romans and the Vikings.
Speaking of history, William Shakespeare wrote a play titled, “Macbeth.”  This small shrine at the top of a hill is where Macbeth’s castle once stood.
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And here’s some more history- Flat Stanley visited the site where Vanora is buried.  According to legend, she was King Arthur’s wife, Queen Guinevere.  After Arthur’s death, the queen moved to a nunnery and changed her name.
This man is a miller in a mill that still has a wheel that is turned by water.  The mill with its waterwheel was an amazing piece of technology!
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Here is some corn that was ground in the mill.  In Medieval times all grain was called “corn.”
And now, on to the Narrow Boats!
In the late 1700s the Union Canal was built between Edinburgh and Glasgow to carry coal in barges for the mills and the distilleries.
The railways replaced the barges on the canals, but now tourists can rent narrow boats.
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There is a lock system that raises and lowers boats.
This was a long tunnel that didn’t really have to be built.  Back in the days when being rich meant you received special treatment, a wealthy landowner didn’t want a canal within view of his estate, so he insisted that a tunnel be built instead.
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This is the narrow boat Flat Stanley sailed on for a week.  It was called the Ruffed Grouse and was rented by Capercaillie Cruises.
This is an interesting carving by the canal on the way to Edinburgh.
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People in narrow boats simply tie up at night and sleep onboard.
This is Edinburgh castle.
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Imagine getting hit by one of these stone cannon balls!
Flat Stanley liked the history of the Scottish Stone of Destiny.
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And he helped re-enact the creation of the Scottish sceptre and the crown jewels.
Flat Stanley visited Linlithgow Castle.  That’s where Mary Queen of Scots was born.
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Too bad armour didn’t come in a smaller size for Stanley!
This was a the top of a tower of Linlithgow Castle.  Those rocks that stick out were stairs that led up even higher.  No guard rails!  Pretty scary!
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This is a view of one of the walls of Linlithgow Castle.  It was one of Stanley’s favourite historic sites.
Fortunately, it’s not a crime to be flat.  This police officer gave Stanley a tour of the Linlithgow police station.
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Then it was back to the canal and through the locks.
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To one of the most amazing things Flat Stanley had ever seen…
… the Falkirk Wheel!
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This amazing structure replaced many locks.  It rotates and moves a basin of water and two boats from the top to the bottom and from the bottom to the top.  It is so well-balanced that it can move 4 boats and hundreds of people and two huge basins of water with the same amount of energy as operating 6 toasters!
We aren’t in Scotland any more, we are in York, England, at the Railway Museum.  Queen Victoria posed with Flat Stanley in her personal royal railway car.
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Yorkminster was very impressive!
Remember the Vikings that the Picts battled?  These are actual Viking combs and tools.  They were preserved underground in what is today the city of York.  They are on display in an amazing place called Jarvik.
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These are Viking tools.
Here are some more Viking tools.
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This is the actual skeleton from Viking times.  Marks on the bones indicate where he was injured and what caused his death.
It’s hard to believe, but even though these people died more than a thousand years ago, their bones still tell the story of what happened to them.  There were serious injuries caused by weapons such as the battle-axe.
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Saint Paul Winter Carnival

Here are some photos of Flat Stanley visiting the 2004 Ice Palace at the Winter Carnival in Saint Paul, Minnesota
In 1885 a New York reporter wrote that Saint Paul was “another Siberia, unfit for human habitation” in winter. Offended by this attack on their Capital City, the Saint Paul Chamber of Commerce decided to not only prove that Saint Paul was habitable but that its citizens were very much alive during winter, the most dominant season. Thus was born the Saint Paul Winter Carnival.

The first ice palace was made for the Saint Paul Winter Carnival in 1886, the first year of this annual event. It was designed and built by A.C. and J.H. Hutchison from Montreal, Canada. Due to a widespread out-break of smallpox, Montreal’s Winter Festival was cancelled and Saint Paul business leaders were able to hire the Hutchisons to complete Saint Paul’s first ice palace.

The Saint Paul Winter Carnival is the nation’s oldest and coldest civic celebration, going strong for over 114 years. The Winter Carnival takes place during the last week of January – typically the coldest week of the year. In 1888, the tallest building (at that time) in Saint Paul melted. It was a 130 foot tall palace made with 55,000 blocks of ice. A popular feature in the ice palaces of the 1800’s was the number of people choosing to get married in them. The first was George G. Brown and Eva N. Evans in 1888. Some think Eva held George to his promise that “it would be a cold day before he got married.”

The ice palace built in 1986, for the 100th anniversary of the event, resembled the early structures in height. That ice palace’s highest point measured close to 129 feet. However, the ice palace built in 1992, the year Minnesota hosted the Super Bowl, surpassed all other ice palaces in height. The 1992 ice palace’s tallest tower was 166 feet
and 6 inches tall and at its widest point was 249 feet. The 1992 ice palace became the “World’s Largest Ice Palace,” and continues to hold that record to this day.

Russia

Hi Dale,

I wanted you to see this photo of Flat Stanley in front of a church in St. Petersburg, Russia. One of my students sent his Stanley to his great aunt Olga.  Aunt Olga has broken English so it is so sweet to read her emails.

This is my fourth year to participate in the project and each year it gets better and better! This year the hosts are being so creative sending amusing letters to the children. One of our Stanley’s is at Fort Leonard, Missouri and had to do pushups because he was wearing the wrong uniform!  Another Stanley was visiting a child’s aunt that has cats.  Stanley loved playing with the cats and when he was done this aunt just took a lint remover over Stanley to get rid of the cat hair! Another
advantage of being flat!

I did receive a letter from a child’s aunt who works at a publishing company in Philadelphia, PA. Here is what she had to say:

Dear Mrs. Mullen,
Everyone loves to receive letters. Your Flat Stanley project is an inspired encouragement for children to write letters and to discover the pleasure of reading and receiving mail.
My niece sent a copy of your letter to me and I’ve passed a copy to my co-workers. Stanley Lambchop touches something inside all of them.
Sincerely,
T.P.

Take care now,
Cathy Mullen
St. Francis School Kindergarten
Clearfield,PA


Mr. Hubert,

My son is a first grade student @ the Mark Twain Elementary school in Centennial, Colorado.

This project is one of the best I’ve heard of or seen in action in my 54 years on this planet.

The attachment is taken from the edge of Red Square with Lenin’s tomb and Saint Basil’s Cathedral in the background. Stanley is posing with Katya, our friend Sasha’s daughter. He has been to St. Petersberg and is now on his way to the southwestern Russian city of Orel.

Thanks so much. Our son, Nikita, and his classmates are having the time of their lives with this project. Mrs. Warren has been wonderful with the geographical/social studies take offs in her curriculum.

Thanks again,

Wayne Nickless

Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea

Mr. Hubert,

My cousin is a pilot in Papua New Guinea.  We decided to send Flat Stanley there for some flying adventures.  He started his day in Ukarumpa and flew to an island called Long Island (not the one in New York!) then to a resort town called Madang and back to Ukarumpa.  Flat Stanley got to meet some Bible translators (one man who has finished more than three complete translations) and see some amazing sights.

We also sent Flat Stanley with my uncle to Korea, with another cousin (who made him a winter wardrobe) to Washington D.C. and on a backpacking trip in the Sierras so we may have some more adventurous pictures for you.  My mother is going to make me a Flat Stanley scrapbook to record these special memories.

We hope you enjoy these pictures.

Sincerely,

Chloe Abell

Pakistan Exchange

Pakistan – England Joint Project

Pakistan launched first Flat Stanley Project. This was between Stp Peters Smithhill School– Lanshire —- SLS- School-Rawalpindi. We (British Council)  facilitated this process, school children were taken to three location in Islamabad. This will give a global perspective and create bonds between two schools/countries…help make friends.

Please post these photos of Flat Stanley visiting:
1) Faisal Mosque
2) Outside Presidency
3) Damn-e-Koh ( Margallah hills)

Flat Stanley also celebrated one of kids birthday. Kids enjoyed his presence very much.

Olympics 2006

Flat Stanley at the 2006 Olympics

(Special thanks to Bernard Weil and Randy Starkman)

Canada’s five-medal winner Cindy Klassen poses with “Sydney”, a scarf Star photographer Bernard Weil asked her to wear at medal ceremonies, and “Flat Stanley” a cut out doll given to her by Star reporter Randy Starkman.

Gold-medal winning cross country skier Chandra Crawford   and her proud parents on the bus

Marnie McBean and Canadian Olympic Development Association p.r. director Chris Dornan

Clara Hughes putting gold around Stanley’s neck and some Dutch fans

Oh oh- run over by the Zamboni!                                    Hiding in the flowers in Turin


From Uncle Nippy

Here are some more pictures of Flat Stanley at the Winter Olympics in Torino Italy.  He is exploring the Olympics with “Uncle Nippy”, Nippy is a US volunteer in the Olympic village which allows Flat Stanley opportunity to meet athletes from around the world.   He has ridden a snow mobile, been on the ski slopes, had lunch at an Italian deli, and met Gliz and Neve the Olympic mascots.  (see attached)

Flat Stanley was sent to Uncle Nippy from my son Daniel. He is in Mrs. Fletcher’s 1st grade class, Woodland Springs Elementary, Keller, Texas.

Uncle Nippy with Gliz and Neve

Nunavut – Bathurst Inlet

Bathurst Inlet, Nunavut

Submitted by Dale Hubert

In July, 2006, Flat Stanley visited Bathurst Inlet, the smallest community in the newest Canadian Territory, Nunavut.

There are only 16 people living in Bathurst Inlet.

This is the community. It’s on the Arctic Ocean at Bathurst Inlet.

This is Stanley’s certificate from Bathurst Inlet Lodge

Flat Stanley found an artifact- an Inuit soapstone container.

Flat Stanley checked out a ground squirrel burrow, but no one was home.

Sam was an expert on Inuit tools.

Glenn was an RCMP officer. This is what he wore in the winter.

People still need furs in the far north.

Flat Stanley enjoyed watching the Inuit games of skill.

This was a traditional Inuit candle and stove. It got very hot!

What a lucky man Gary is! He found an Inuit arrowhead among the rocks on this beach.

Pudjuk took Flat Stanley rock sliding.

The northern lights have seen strange sights…

This is Martin.

Flat Stanley is in a kayak.

Flat Stanley found some amethysts! There were diamonds nearby, but he didn’t find any of those.

This dog’s fur coat was very thick, even in the summer. This is Esker.

Brrr! Even in July the Arctic waters are cold!

The Nunavut flag: Yellow for the midnight sun, white for snow, and an inukshuk.

Flat Stanley saw a caribou.

“I thought bears only did that in the forest!”

And here’s the grizzly bear who did it.

These stromatolite fossils are 2.7 billion years old!

Page Burt was an expert on everything. She made the whole trip worthwhile.

It really is the land of the midnight sun. I took this picture exactly at midnight.

In some places the only life seemed to be lichen.

Nunavut- Alert

The Arctic Adventures Of Flat Stanley
October 9 – October 17, 2003


Flat Stanley’s Visit To Alert, Nunavut
This is a special update for Miss Tooley’s grade 4 class at Wilshire Elementary School. As part of a class project, Miss Tooley’s students made their own Flat Stanleys and sent them to various places across Canada. One of her students, Darren, sent his Flat Stanley up to me in Alert.
Now, Flat Stanley is visiting the world’s northernmost permanently-inhabited community! For the past week, I have been taking Stanley around and showing him all the sights of Alert, and teaching him a little bit about Canada’s arctic. I have also been filling out Stanley’s journal so that the rest of Miss Tooley’s class can learn a little bit about life in the north when Stanley returns. Here are some of the places that Stanley and I have visited together during his trip.


At 82º30’N, Alert is the most northern community in the world. Alert is home to a Canadian Forces Station, in addition to an Environment Canada weather station, and atmosphere monitoring laboratory. Alert is in the Canadian Territory of Nunavut (although the sign you see in the picture still reads NWT, for Northwest Territories). There have been people living in Alert since the 1950’s.

As you can see from the picture, Alert is proud to be Canadian! Everyone living in Alert is Canadian, and speaks French or English (or both!).

In this picture, Stanley and I are standing beside an inuksuk. Inuksuit are traditionally built by Inuit people to mark the places they have travelled. There are no Inuit people who live permanently in Alert, so this inuksuk was built by some military personnel who worked in Alert in the summer.

There are no trees in Alert, because trees cannot grow this far north. The ground is mostly flat near where I live, but as you can see, there are some hills in the background. There are also lots of cliffs along the arctic ocean coastline. The temperature here is around -20 ºC right now, and there are only a few hours of daylight. Soon it will be dark for 24 hours a day. In Alert, we have 24-hour daylight for about half the year, and 24-hour darkness for the other half. Right now, we are just at the end of the transition period between 24-hour daylight and 24-hour darkness.

While Stanley was visiting Alert, we drove around in my big blue truck. We need tracks like these in the winter to drive through all of the snow that blows around and builds up. I don’t think Stan has ever been in a truck like this before!

While we were so close to the north pole, we decided to take a visit to Santa’s workshop…

…and visit Santa himself!

So long, Stanley! I hope you enjoyed your trip to Alert, Nunavut. Have fun back at Wilshire Elementary (and say hello to Darren for me)!