Category Archives: Dale Hubert

Peggy Seeger

Flat Stanley enjoyed visiting with the excellent musician and captivating entertainer, in London, Ontario on September 19, 2009. Here’s a song by Peggy Seeger for use on the Flat Stanley Project, One Plus One is Two:

DSC_0250-s

She is holding the very same Flat Stanley that Dale Hubert sent to Peggy’s half-brother, Pete Seeger. On the back of this flat Stanley is Pete’s message:

“Kids- if YOU keep your sense of humor, and reach out to other kids in ALL the world, and get them to reach out to you in their own way, there may be a human race here in another 100 years!”

Mr. Hubert’s Class at Wilfrid Jury School

Mr. Hubert’s Grade 3 Class in Ontario doing Flat Stanley activities.


This Stanley from South Africa is getting a first look at snow.


Making Stanleys and replying to letters

Flat Stanley Racers on the Ramp
Students make a Flat Stanley Racer, then let it roll down the ramp.  They estimate the distance and record it in their books.  They then measure the actual distance and compare it to their estimate.  Some very creative Racers have been constructed this year!

Times Journal Article April, 1998

Ranger Stanley – Scotland National Parks

Following a very unfortunate incident that resulted in a very fortunate meeting with Park Rangers in the Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park, Flat Stanley has been invited to become a Park Ranger! More postings to come.

rangers

Flat Stanley and the Flat Tires. (Or, Flat Tyres for our Scottish friends!) The creator of the Flat Stanley Project gets two flat tires while taking Flat Stanley through Scotland. Here are the two Park Rangers, Caroline and Beverley who came to the rescue. No kidding, they were great!

flat tire Stanley

Washington, DC- Childnet Awards

The Flat Stanley Project was a winner of a Childnet International Award

The awards ceremony took place in Washington, DC, the week of April 16, 2001.  If you have an innovative and interesting idea for a web project, consider contacting Childnet at: www.childnet-int.org and become a part of the Dot Hope Effect.
Here are some images of Stanley in Washington

Welcome to the Hyatt Regency at Capital Hill

Stanley with Nigel Williams, Director and Creator of Childnet International
(many thanks for a wonderful time!)


At the Lincoln Memorial


then it was off to the Washington Zoo

then to the Smithsonian Museum of Space and Flight

One small step for a man,
one giant leap for a Flat Stanley

The Awards Ceremony were held at the National Geographic Society Headquarters


Florence Harper, a Washington teacher, and her mother brought a bunch of Flat Stanleys to the event

The Flat Stanley Project placed second at the Childnet International Awards Ceremony in the Individual Category

Scotland

 

Flat Stanley Visited Scotland

dale-personalimage
Submitted by Dale Hubert
 
DSCN0716Flat Stanley stayed in the fishing village of Pittenweem.
He stayed at the Giles House.  It was a lovely old building with a spiral stone staircase.DSCN0719
 
 
There was beautiful scenery everywhere.DSCN0276
This old mill was used to pump water into the salt basins.  Then the basins were heated and the water would evaporate, leaving the salt behind.DSCN0416
 
 
There were castles all over the place!
This is Stirling Castle.  Most of Stirling Castle dates back to the 100 year period between 1496 and 1583.  The Castle provided a home for Scottish Kings and Queens from the days of Alexander I (and probably earlier) until the Union of the Scottish and English Crowns under James VI. Even in Roman times there was a fortress on this site.DSCN0050
This is what the kitchen of a castle would have looked like.  Flat Stanley was helping make bread.DSCN0059
 
 
DSCN0065The Stirling Castle tour guide posed with Flat Stanley.
Flat Stanley liked the pictures of the Highland Cattle.DSCN0076
 
DSCN0081
Sir William Wallace (1267-1305) was a Scottish hero. In 1296, Edward I of England invaded Scotland and the Scottish Wars of Independence began. William Wallace began a guerrilla campaign against the English. On September 11, 1297, the Scots defeated the English army at the Battle of Stirling Bridge.
After defeat at the Battle of Falkirk in 1298, Wallace was betrayed and captured.
Wallace was also called Braveheart.
This is the view from the tower of the Wallace Monument.  It is 220 feet (67m) high and was opened in 1869.
DSCN0084
DSCN0085
There are 246 steps and Flat Stanley was pretty much worn out by the time he reached the top.  But the view was worth it!
This is a statue of Wallace.  Flat Stanley thought it looked quite a bit like Mel Gibson.
That’s the tower of the Wallace Monument in the background.
DSCN0104
DSCN0128
Can you guess what this is?  Yes, it’s a Medieval toilet.  Ever wonder why kings and queens had so many castles and spent so much time travelling?  Well, one of the reasons was that after a couple of months at a castle the place would get stinky and they’d move on.
The toilet room was called the garderobe.  The hole was often placed above a stream.  People used to hang their clothes in the garderobe so the odour would keep moths away.  This was called a wardrobe.
Flat Stanley visited the lesser known Balgonie Castle.  It was a wonderful place and the Laird of Balgonie castle himself gave him a tour.
DSCN0137
DSCN0133
Not too long ago there was a tax law that made people pay taxes on all livable structures on their property.  The definition of a livable structure was if it had a roof.  So, in order to save money on taxes, people smashed in the roofs of these ancient buildings.  That caused them to deteriorate very quickly.  The Laird of Balgonie Castle and his wife, the Lady of Balgonie Castle, are restoring this ancient dwelling.  Many people travel here to get married in the Medieval church within the castle.
Flat Stanley sailed to the nearby Isle of May.  He saw puffins and eiders and thousands of gulls.
DSCN0176
DSCN0214
They are hard to see, but behind Flat Stanley are many thousands of birds nesting on the rocks.
The puffins nest in burrows.
DSCN0220
DSCN0224
This female eider is on a nest.  Because it so cold where the eiders live, they grow feathers that are especially warm.  People use the down feathers from the eider to make eider down insulated clothing.
Unfortunately, much of Scotland’s history involved wars.  The Catholics and Protestants fought against each other even though they were both Christians.  This is the remains of St Andrews Cathedral.  It was built in 1160 and consecrated in 1318 in the presence of Robert the Bruce.
DSCN0519
DSCN0528
St Andrews Cathedral was by far the largest cathedral in Scotland and one of the longest in Britain.  It was 109 metres (357 feet) long!
What happened to it?  John Knox, the famous Scottish leader of the Reformation gave a particularly stirring speech at another church and his congregation marched to St Andrews Cathedral and destroyed it.
This figure represents Cardinal David Beaton.  He was part of the bloody history of St Andrews.  In 1528 the Cardinal had John Wishart burned at the stake for preaching the Protestant faith rather than the Roman Catholic.  Wishart wasn’t the only one to be burned at the stake, but shortly after his death Cardinal Beaton was murdered in revenge.
John Knox was considered to be a supporter of the murder, so he was sent away to work on a French prison galley ship for two years.  After he returned he gave the fiery speech that resulted in the destruction of the cathedral.
DSCN0557
DSCN0528
Although it is now a ruin and most of the rubble was taken by townspeople to construct other buildings, one of the towers remains standing.  Flat Stanley had a wonderful view from the top.
This is the tower he climbed.
DSCN0544
DSCN0554
These medals are from the Bishops of St Andrews.
This was the basement of the cathedral.  It has a barrel-vaulted ceiling and is a wonderful example of Medieval architecture.
DSCN0555
DSCN0572
Of course, not everything in Scotland had to do with war and fighting.  There were lovely gardens and wonderful people.  Flat Stanley is posing with an artist.
If you are ever in Scotland and want to visit one the best tea-houses, go to the Loganlea Restaurant in Forestmill, Clackmannanshire.
loganlea
DSCN0597
The oldest tennis court in continuous use is at Falkland Castle.  Mary Queen of Scots played here.
Of course, kings and queens didn’t bother bending down to pick up the tennis balls, so their servants did that and put the ball into play.  That’s where the word “serve” came from in tennis – from the servant starting the game.
DSCN0598
DSCN0646
Flat Stanley had never seen a Toad Crossing sign before.
(He didn’t see any toads, either.)
Oh, oh- back to the scary history of Scotland.  This didn’t happen in Medieval times, though.  This was from the 1950s and 1960s.  This is Scotland’s Secret Bunker.  http://www.secretbunker.co.uk/
On the outside it looks like an ordinary farmhouse (except for the solid steel shutters) but underneath it is a tunnel and a command centre.
DSCN0713
DSCN0711
This corridor leads down to the area that can withstand a nuclear bomb.
It used to be a very secret place and has only recently been opened to the public.DSCN0694
DSCN0690
 
BBC Radio was all ready to take to the airwaves to tell the people what to do in case of a nuclear attack.
And to play soothing music as the bombs fell.
There was a radar centre.
DSCN0709
DSCN0692
And beds for those who were allowed to go into the bunker.
Have you ever read, “Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes?”  Children in Japan sent one thousand paper cranes to the Underground Bunker in a prayer for peace in the hopes that nuclear weapons would never be used against people again.
DSCN0699
DSCN0767
Ahh!  It’s an Eagle Owl!  Do they eat Flat Stanleys?
Fortunately, it was very well-trained.
DSCN0762
Before the Scots lived in Scotland there was a group of people called the Picts.  Not much remains of them, except for the Pictish stones.
DSCN0817
DSCN0819
The Picts carved mysterious shapes in stones and stood them up in fields.  These are preserved in a museum.
The stone on the right was not carved by the Picts.  It was carved by the Vikings.
vikingstone
DSCN0821
The Picts used the shape of the cross even before they converted to Christianity.
There are still Pictish stones standing in fields.  The farmers simply plough around them.
DSCN0895
DSCN1054
This carving is more than one thousand years old!  The Picts battled with the Romans and the Vikings.
Speaking of history, William Shakespeare wrote a play titled, “Macbeth.”  This small shrine at the top of a hill is where Macbeth’s castle once stood.
DSCN0874
DSCN0844
And here’s some more history- Flat Stanley visited the site where Vanora is buried.  According to legend, she was King Arthur’s wife, Queen Guinevere.  After Arthur’s death, the queen moved to a nunnery and changed her name.
This man is a miller in a mill that still has a wheel that is turned by water.  The mill with its waterwheel was an amazing piece of technology!
DSCN1154
DSCN1144
Here is some corn that was ground in the mill.  In Medieval times all grain was called “corn.”
And now, on to the Narrow Boats!
In the late 1700s the Union Canal was built between Edinburgh and Glasgow to carry coal in barges for the mills and the distilleries.
The railways replaced the barges on the canals, but now tourists can rent narrow boats.
DSCN1306
DSCN1333
There is a lock system that raises and lowers boats.
This was a long tunnel that didn’t really have to be built.  Back in the days when being rich meant you received special treatment, a wealthy landowner didn’t want a canal within view of his estate, so he insisted that a tunnel be built instead.
DSCN1344
DSCN1378
This is the narrow boat Flat Stanley sailed on for a week.  It was called the Ruffed Grouse and was rented by Capercaillie Cruises.
This is an interesting carving by the canal on the way to Edinburgh.
DSCN1389
DSCN1391
People in narrow boats simply tie up at night and sleep onboard.
This is Edinburgh castle.
DSCN1415
DSCN1426
Imagine getting hit by one of these stone cannon balls!
Flat Stanley liked the history of the Scottish Stone of Destiny.
DSCN1429
DSCN1431
And he helped re-enact the creation of the Scottish sceptre and the crown jewels.
Flat Stanley visited Linlithgow Castle.  That’s where Mary Queen of Scots was born.
DSCN1432
DSCN1444
Too bad armour didn’t come in a smaller size for Stanley!
This was a the top of a tower of Linlithgow Castle.  Those rocks that stick out were stairs that led up even higher.  No guard rails!  Pretty scary!
DSCN1577
DSCN1578
This is a view of one of the walls of Linlithgow Castle.  It was one of Stanley’s favourite historic sites.
Fortunately, it’s not a crime to be flat.  This police officer gave Stanley a tour of the Linlithgow police station.
DSCN1648
DSCN1647
 
Then it was back to the canal and through the locks.
DSCN1714
DSCN1717
To one of the most amazing things Flat Stanley had ever seen…
… the Falkirk Wheel!
DSCN1729
DSCN1742
This amazing structure replaced many locks.  It rotates and moves a basin of water and two boats from the top to the bottom and from the bottom to the top.  It is so well-balanced that it can move 4 boats and hundreds of people and two huge basins of water with the same amount of energy as operating 6 toasters!
We aren’t in Scotland any more, we are in York, England, at the Railway Museum.  Queen Victoria posed with Flat Stanley in her personal royal railway car.
DSCN2072
DSCN2113
Yorkminster was very impressive!
Remember the Vikings that the Picts battled?  These are actual Viking combs and tools.  They were preserved underground in what is today the city of York.  They are on display in an amazing place called Jarvik.
DSCN2123
DSCN2125
These are Viking tools.
Here are some more Viking tools.
DSCN2126
DSCN2128
This is the actual skeleton from Viking times.  Marks on the bones indicate where he was injured and what caused his death.
It’s hard to believe, but even though these people died more than a thousand years ago, their bones still tell the story of what happened to them.  There were serious injuries caused by weapons such as the battle-axe.
DSCN2129
   

Sugarbush near London

Flat Stanley Went to a Sugarbush In Southern Ontario, Canada

Submitted by Dale Hubert

Hayden sent me a Stanley from Montgomery. Alabama and I took him, along with some other Stanleys,  to where maple syrup is made.  We went on March 27 and there was still some snow, but it was melting fast.
First the farmer has to tap the trees.  The means a small hole has to be drilled and a spout called a spile is inserted.  The sap runs out into the buckets.  The sap looks like water but has a slight sweet taste.  The Native Canadians used to call it “sweetwater.”  After many hundreds of buckets are collected, the sap is boiled.  The water slowly evaporates and the maple syrup is left.

Stanley should be careful around the buckets.  He’s lucky the sap wasn’t running.

He went for a wagon ride through the maple forest.  The horses had never seen a flat person before.

Stanley saw where the sap gets boiled.  The sap gets turned into maple syrup and maple candy in all different sizes.

But the best part was eating the maple syrup when it was poured over pancakes!

London Mayor Anne Marie DeCicco

dale-personalimageSubmitted by Dale Hubert

LondonMayorDeCicco-Flat-Sta

As Londoners, we are very proud the wonderful Flat Stanley Project actually began in our city by local teacher Mr. Dale Hubert.  As London’s Mayor, I was delighted to receive a visit from Flat Stanley at my office a few months ago.  It was great to show Flat Stanley around City Hall and explain how Londoners elect members of City Council every three years to take care of the city’s business.  During the visit, we dropped by Council Chambers where all the important city decisions are made and we enjoyed a beautiful view of The Forest City from the top of City Hall.  I know Flat Stanley will be very busy visiting many more places, so I wish all Friends of Flat Stanley lots of fun and happy memories.
Sincerely,
Mayor Anne Marie DeCicco
London, Ontario, Canada

Jumbo the Elephant Statue in St Thomas

dale-personalimageSubmitted by Dale Hubert

Jumbo the Elephant was a favourite attraction in Phineas T. Barnum’s circus.  Sadly, Jumbo was killed by a train on September 15, 1885 in St Thomas, Ontario, Canada.
jumbo-2
There are two stories of how it happened.  The circus people said Jumbo saw the train approaching and a smaller elephant was on the tracks.  Jumbo, being a noble and brave creature, pushed the smaller elephant out the way just in time but was killed by the train.
jumbo jumbo-4
A more likely story is that Jumbo was being led beside the tracks when the train approached.  Elephants don’t like to walk downhill so, instead of moving down the embankment, Jumbo charged the train and was killed.
However, it happened, the most famous elephant in the world was dead.  There is a statue of Jumbo in St Thomas and Flat Stanley went to see it.  Notice Stanley is about the size of Jumbo’s toenail!

jumbo-3

Hawk Cliff

Submitted by Dale Hubert

Flat Stanley visited Hawk Cliff on the north shore of Lake Erie in Southern Ontario.  It is one of the best migratory routes for raptors in the whole world.  When the birds fly south they don’t like to fly over water.  They prefer flying near land so they can rest and find food.  They also like to fly along the cliffs so the thermals help them fly with less effort.  In the fall, 30,000 Broadwing Hawks fly over in a single day!

hc-sign

There are some licensed banding stations.  These are strictly controlled and only a chosen few get to become bird banders.  Bird banders capture the hawks and record the specie, whether they are male or female, if they hatched this year or are older and record their size and weight.  The birds are banded and released.  The bands numbers so that when people find birds with a bands they can call the 800 telephone number and tell the band number.  That lets the experts know how far the hawk travelled, how old it is, and how many hawks there are.  This is very important research.

hc-shed

The banders wait in this tiny shack for the birds to get caught in the nets.

hc-hawkhead1

This is a Red-Tailed Hawk that was caught, banded and released.

hc-fsnet3

This is a Sharp-Shinned Hawk and a Flat Stanley caught in the net.

hc-fswing

Flat Stanley sure was brave!  Those Red-Tail Hawks can be mean.

hc-dhubert-fs

Dale Hubert, the creator of the Flat Stanley Project, holds a Red-Tailed Hawk and a Flat Stanley.

hc-grasshawk

Don’t try this at home, kids!

The picture above shows something very unusual.  A Red-Tailed Hawk went into the net but after a few seconds it hopped out.  Gary Hubert, one of the banders, ran after the hawk and captured it with his bare hands!

hc-talonstuck

Then the hawk captured Gary, too.  Ouch!

hc-talonpull

The other banders had to help pull the talons out of Gary’s finger.

hc-gary

This is Gary and the Red-Tailed Hawk.

hc-talons

Look at the size of those talons.  Can you see the band on its leg?

The birds are handled very carefully and aren’t hurt at all.  In fact, some hawks come back several times.  The hawks don’t treat the banders as carefully as the following pictures show.

hc-release

In the picture above, master bander Bob Hubert is releasing this Red-Tailed Hawk, but the hawk didn’t release him.  Just as it took flight it grabbed onto Bob’s arm.  There were several punctures wounds.  The picture below is a close-up of the hawk grabbing his arm.

hk-yeow-closeup

hc-banders

These are the banders who were at the banding station that Flat Stanley visited.  From left to right they are Bob Hubert, his brother Gary Hubert and long time friend, Frank Henry.

Nunavut – Bathurst Inlet

Bathurst Inlet, Nunavut

Submitted by Dale Hubert

In July, 2006, Flat Stanley visited Bathurst Inlet, the smallest community in the newest Canadian Territory, Nunavut.

There are only 16 people living in Bathurst Inlet.

This is the community. It’s on the Arctic Ocean at Bathurst Inlet.

This is Stanley’s certificate from Bathurst Inlet Lodge

Flat Stanley found an artifact- an Inuit soapstone container.

Flat Stanley checked out a ground squirrel burrow, but no one was home.

Sam was an expert on Inuit tools.

Glenn was an RCMP officer. This is what he wore in the winter.

People still need furs in the far north.

Flat Stanley enjoyed watching the Inuit games of skill.

This was a traditional Inuit candle and stove. It got very hot!

What a lucky man Gary is! He found an Inuit arrowhead among the rocks on this beach.

Pudjuk took Flat Stanley rock sliding.

The northern lights have seen strange sights…

This is Martin.

Flat Stanley is in a kayak.

Flat Stanley found some amethysts! There were diamonds nearby, but he didn’t find any of those.

This dog’s fur coat was very thick, even in the summer. This is Esker.

Brrr! Even in July the Arctic waters are cold!

The Nunavut flag: Yellow for the midnight sun, white for snow, and an inukshuk.

Flat Stanley saw a caribou.

“I thought bears only did that in the forest!”

And here’s the grizzly bear who did it.

These stromatolite fossils are 2.7 billion years old!

Page Burt was an expert on everything. She made the whole trip worthwhile.

It really is the land of the midnight sun. I took this picture exactly at midnight.

In some places the only life seemed to be lichen.

New York City

Flat Stanley Went to New York City

Submitted by Dale Hubert

Flat Stanley had a wonderful time in New York City! He pretended to be King Kong on the Empire State Building, he spent time at Central Park, he visited the Museum of Natural Sciences and he went to Ground Zero.

New Yorkers were very friendly!

These are statues in Central Park

This is a statue to Balto and other sled dogs that delivered medicine

A Tyrannosaurus Rex!

A very kind dino expert gave Stanley a close-up view!

The “I Love New York” T-shirt is a bit big!

(Not the real Statue of Liberty)

Rockefeller Center, January 2004

Stanley was disappointed that the New York Public Library was closed on Sunday

But a beautiful young woman came to his rescue- lucky Stanley!

Stanley at Ground Zero on a foggy winter day

On a fire truck across from Ground Zero

A Police Officer at the Empire State Building What is it with Stanley and beautiful young women?

Everyone wants to pose with Flat Stanley!

(This Flat Stanley is from Taylor Likes of Mrs. Pashea’s 3rd Grade at Wayne Center School.)

These nice people recognized Flat Stanley at Madison Square Garden

Mexico and the Mayans

Flat Stanley in Mexico

Submitted by Dale Hubert
Flat Stanley had a wonderful time in the Mayan Riviera. He swam with dolphins, went to some Mayan villages, visited ancient ruins and relaxed by the pools.  These flat characters are from Bronna Silver’s Grade 3 class at St. Andrews Public School, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada.
Flat Stanley swam in a sacred cavern

In September, 2003, Flat Stanley visited the pyramids of Egypt and in February, 2004, he visited the Mayan pyramids. Unlike the Egyptian pyramids that were built by slave labour, the Mayan people considered it an honour to build the pyramids. There are many pyramids still covered by jungle but there is not the money to excavate them.
This picture shows an area that has not been excavated.
Below is a portion that has been excavated.

The Mayan ruins were amazing! The temples of Coba and Chichen-Itza were built in the Classical Period more than 1500 years ago. 60,000 people lived in this city.

Only the Mayan priests were allowed to climb the pyramids back then, but tourists are allowed to climb them today. Flat Stanley didn’t have a fear of heights, but many tourists sure do! Flat Stanley liked watching them go back down the pyramids- many sat on their bottoms and went down very slowly, one step at a time.
At the top of the pyramid in Chichen-Itza a woman recognized Flat Stanley. She had used him in her classroom and now teaches teachers at a college. She posed with Flat Stanley in the room at the very top. Here are some pictures of Flat Stanley at the top of the pyramid and the view of the surrounding ruins and jungle.


Even the experts disagree about important parts of Mayan life. For example, the Mayans played a game with a large rubber ball that weighed 8 kilograms. The team captains tried to put the ball through the stone hoop. In one version of the game they couldn‘t use their hands or feet- they had to use their hips. Another way of playing used sticks that were used like racquets. You can see the stone hoops in these pictures. We’ve all played games like this, but here’s the interesting part about this game- when the game was over, one of the team captains was put to death. Some experts say it was the captain of the losing team who was killed and some say it was the captain of the winning team who was killed.

Ancient Basketball or Quidditch?
There are good arguments for each side. Those who say the losing captain was killed say the game was a type of test. Those who passed the test would be able to go on to the next test, while those who failed would not be able to go on. Those who say the captain of the winning team was put to death say the Mayans believed the gods needed to be fed blood. The best food was the blood of the best athletes. It was an honour to be killed for the sake of the gods. All that we know for sure is that the game was a very important part of Mayan culture and that someone was killed after each game.

Flat Stanley didn’t like the part about the blood. He turned pale when he heard that Mayans used the sharp part from sting rays to pierce their bodies and bleed. They even pushed the sharp spine through their tongues, ears and other sensitive places, then burned the blood with incense as an offering to the gods. Later on in Mayan civilization, after the arrival of the Tolteks, human sacrifices were added to their rituals. Things are very quiet at Chichen-Itza now, apart from the tourists, but many years ago this place was known for the blood and the human sacrifices.
The arrival of the Spanish in 1572 changed Mayan life forever. That is why Spanish is the language spoken by so many Mexicans today. The Spanish were very cruel to the Mayan people. The Spanish leader, Cortez, insisted that he be allowed to climb to the top of the pyramid at Chichen-Itza but when he got to the top the remains from all the sacrifices almost made him sick.

The priests and leaders of the ancient Mayans had a very important role. It was believed they could communicate with the gods and ask the rain gods to make it rain by giving gifts of blood and sacrifice. Unfortunately, there was a very bad drought that lasted for years. The Mayan people lost faith in the powers of their leaders and even had many of them killed. When the priests and royal families were gone, there was no one to continue the Mayan traditions and the culture collapsed.
Don’t forget, though- there are still Mayans today.  Here are three who made lunch for Flat Stanley and his friends.  they posed with him, but didn’t really understand him.  Imagine trying to explain the Flat Stanley Project to people who don’t speak much English and don’t have electricity or the Internet.

Hungary and Austria

Flat Stanley went to Budapest and Vienna for Christmas, 2003

Hungary

The first thing Flat Stanley noticed in Budapest
was how fast the escalators to the subway moved!
It’s the oldest subway system on the continent.


A lovely young Hungarian lady introduced Flat Stanley to her beautiful dolls.  It was love at first sight!
Stanley liked the hand-painted eggs, too.


The ancient statues in Budapest let Flat Stanley pose with them.


Even the police officers were very friendly.


There were statues all over Budapest.  The one on the left was made by the Russians.
It is not well-liked.

When the Russians were there they probably wouldn’t have liked Flat Stanley, either.


Now that the Russians are gone, Hungarians use their own parliament.

It is one of the most beautiful parliament buildings in the world.

Flat Stanley is on the staircase.

Austria

Flat Stanley really enjoyed flying Austrian Airlines.  The Flight Attendants were great!
Stanley’s clothing was almost a match for their uniforms.

Stanley was almost on the menu and he even got to sit in the cockpit

Flat Stanley met some knights.
The one on the left is a street performer from Vienna who pretends he’s a statue.
The ones on the right are real suits of armour in a museum.


Stanley enjoyed the statues.  They were as quiet as Stanley.

Flat Stanley went to the Museum of Musical Instruments.  He saw the violin that was played by Mozart’s father and many strange guitars.  The museum guards wouldn’t let Stanley touch anything, but they held him up for this picture. No, this isn’t a giant Stanley on the roof, it’s a model of Saint Stephan’s Church in Vienna.


Flat Stanley visited a terrible place.  It was the Concentration Camp at Mauthausen, Austria.


He doesn’t feel like talking about it right now.  It was horrible.

Greece- My Big Flat Greek Vacation

My Big Flat Greek Vacation

Submitted by Dale Hubert

Stanley loved his trip to Greece.

He met some wonderful people.

Stanley got some help in competing at the Olympic Stadium at Delphi.
(Take a close look at the runner’s left hand)

Even the rocks were interesting.  This piece of rock was full of fossilized shells.
It was carved into a piece of a temple at Olympia.

Don’t forget to stop and smell the flowers!

He even went for a swim in the Aegean Sea.

At Meteora the monks built monasteries way up high in the mountains

“Hey,” says Stanley, “don’t blame me- this was ruined when I got here!”

There were some wonderful statues.  Do you know why the heads are missing?

Now tourists visit the Caldera, but 3500 years ago this volcano
off the Island of Santorini blew up and destroyed much of Mediterranean civilization.
Volcanic rocks washed up on the beaches of Egypt.

Flat Stanley enjoyed the sunset in Santorini

Ontario Premier Dalton McGinty and Minister of Education Gerrard Kennedy

The Premier of Ontario and the Minister of Education

Submitted by Dale Hubert

On August 31 Ontario Premier Dalton McGinty and Minister of Education Gerrard Kennedy visited Wilfrid Jury Public School in London, Ontario to make some funding announcements.  Dale Hubert, the creator of the Flat Stanley Project, is a teacher at Wilfrid Jury School so there was a Flat Stanley nearby for a photo opportunity.  Gerrard Kennedy took Flat Stanley with him and we are looking forward to reading his journal.

It was a big deal, with lots of media coverage.

Some of the custodians even dressed up for the event.  (But not all of them)

Egypt (With Dale Hubert)

Egypt

Submitted by Dale Hubert

Stanley poses with some of the treasures of King Tut
(Stanley discovered that King
Tut-Ankh-Amun was murdered when he was 18!)
King Tut had some great things stashed away for the afterlife
fs-tut3“Too bad it’s a little big for me,” says Stanley.
pyramid2I’m 6′ 4″ and you can hardly see me up against the pyramid on the right.  The Flat Stanley in my hand doesn’t show up at all.
This is a water clock- the water slowly drips out and the water level lowers.
It’s wider at the top to account for water pressure.
fs-egypt-guideSalma is a tour guide.  She showed Flat Stanley where to buy things.
Mohamoud was our driver.  There are 17 million people in Cairo-
and no stop signs or traffic lights!  We didn’t see any accidents, though.
The drivers are amazing!

2 Tires Flatter than Stanley in Scotland

The Scotland Trip didn’t end as well as it began. It could have been much worse, though. I didn’t lose control of the vehicle and no one was injured.

flat tire and flat stanleyBut still, we were all deflated when I managed to blow the left front and the left back tires while only 18 miles from the end of the trip. I’d driven more than 1800 miles without incident but as a bus passed closely by on the right side, something on the road wrecked both tires on the left side. Fortunately, I was able to drive the car to the nearby Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. There was even a pay phone there, so it appeared help was on the way “within 60 minutes” according to the person at the tire service. But then the restaurant with the payphone closed and the repair truck hadn’t arrived.

rangersTwo hours later, there was still no sign of help but fortunately, Park Rangers Caroline and Beverley showed up. They were great! They let us use their mobile phone and kept us company for the next hour awaiting the tire service. They even drove some of our group into the next town. After several more calls, the repair truck finally arrived and the Volvo was hoisted onto the flatbed and driven into Balloch.

http://www.lochlomond-trossachs.org/

In Scotland with Dale Hubert

Gardenstown, Scotland

Gardenstown, Scotland

This Flat Stanley spent July 2009 in Scotland with Dale Hubert. The first stop was Gardenstown. There is a ruin on the hilltop that was begun in the year 1004 to commemorate a battle between the Vikings and the Picts. viking church

Speaking of the Picts and Scotland, do you know how the the thistle became associated with Scotland? Take a look a this giant thistle and think about this story. A very long time ago, the Vikings were attacking a group of Picts in the night. The Vikings were trying to sneak up on the sleeping Picts, so the Vikings were running barefoot across the countryside. Suddenly a Viking stepped barefoot onto a giant thistle and as he cried out in pain he awakened the Picts and the surprise attack was ruined.thistle

The Picts

Notice the size of the large standing stone behind the mseum guides.

Notice the size of the large standing stone behind the museum guides.

Little is known about the Picts. The Romans called them the Painted People and that’s where the word “Pict” comes from. As you drive through the Sottish countryside you can see Pictish Standing Stones. There are some examples of Standing Stones in Groan House Museum. This is a great place. There’s a video that outlines the history of the Picts, the staff is friendly and helpful and there’s free admission and parking!

Pict stonework often included crosses

Pict stonework often included crosses

Loch NessNessie 5s

Flat Stanley visited perhaps the most famous place in Scotland, Loch Ness. Even though the experts agree that the existence of a monster verges on the impossible, and most of the photos have been proven as fakes and the photographers themselves have admitted to hoaxes, there’s still a bit of magic connected with Scotland’s deepest loch (lake) and people still peer into the misty distances hoping to see Nessie.

Urquhart Castle and Trebuchet

Urquhart Castle

Urquhart Castle

Urquhart Castle with very thick stone walls

Urquhart Castle with very thick stone walls

Trbuchet ammunition

Trebuchet ammunition

Trebuchet

Reconstruction of a Trebuchet

On the shore of Loch Ness is the ancient Urquhart Castle that legend says was begun in the year 565. Much of what exists today has been reconstructed. Nearby is a trebuchet, a siege weapon that used a counterweight of many tons to launch stone balls. Urquhart Castle changed hands many times and was eventually destroyed by placing barrels of gunpowder in the gatehouse and blowing it up so the enemy could never use it. It has since been partially restored as a tourist attraction.

The Lighthouse

Scotland’s first official lighthouse was built on top of a old castle.

Scotland's first official lighthouse was built on top of an old castle.

One the earliest forms of navigation technology was the lighthouse. This was a way for sailors to tell not only how close there were to shore, but which shore they where nearing. They could tell which shore they were close to because each lighthouse had its own signature. The signature was the order of flashes per minute. Sailors could therefore see the flashing light, look at the chart, and know which lighthouse they were nearing.

lighthouse lens 5-s

lighthouse with Kate-s

The lenses were amazing and even now, as they are on display they cast 3D reflections and almost look like holograms. The lighthouse had a giant clockwork mechanism that caused the light to rotate. Large weights made the mechanism work. The lighthouse keeper had to pull up the large weights every half hour so the light would keep turning.

Looking down inside a lighthouse at the spiral stairs. The chains held weights that made the clockwork mechanism rotate the light.

Looking down inside a lighthouse at the spiral stairs. The chains held weights that made the clockwork mechanism rotate the light.

The lighthouse keeper also had to pump the fuel tanks every half hour to keep the pressure up so the flame would keep burning. So he would pull up the weights using a winch, then 15 minutes later he would use a hand pump to pump air into the fuel tank, then 15 minutes later he would have to rewind the clockwork mechanism, and that was his part of his job for the night. He was also expected to record weather conditions such as wind speed, wind direction and temperature. The lighthouse keeper was even required to paint the lighthouse and keep it in good condition. When it was too foggy to see the lighthouse, a foghorn was used. The foghorn had its own signature as well. Before the foghorn was invented, cannons were fired so when sailors heard the signature of the explosions they would have an idea where they were on the sea.

This cannon was used to warn ships in fog that the shore was nearby.

This cannon was used to warn ships in fog that the shore was nearby. A glass lens is beside it.

Battle of Culloden

One of the battles that lives on in the memories of the Scots is Culloden. William led his Hanoverian army against the Prince Charlie’s Jacobites. The Jacobites were Scots who wanted Bonnie Prince Charlie to become king. It seems that everything went wrong for the Jacobites.

Culloden tour guide

John, the tour guide on the fields of Culloden

It all started well, with the Jacobites well-placed on the field of Culloden, waiting for William’s army. They then discovered that William had given his army the day off to celebrate his birthday and the Jacobites had been waiting in the cold and wet for an army that wasn’t going to attack that day. There was much discussion and the Jacobites finally decided they would march all night to where William’s army was celebrating, and launch a surprise attack by first light of the morning. So they set off in the darkness. Unfortunately, after marching most of the night, the Jacobites realized they wouldn’t reach William’s army in time, so had to turn around and head back to Culloden. They set up their positions again but not quite the same as before. In their haste they were badly positioned with boggy wet ground in front of some of them and a stone wall in front of others. They were tired after marching all night and waiting the day before and many of them hadn’t eaten for three or four days. William’s army arrived and set up. There were three lines of men with guns so they could take turns firing. While one line reloaded, the other line fired. William’s army also had more cannons with trained men to fire them. As the Jacobites attacked in the ferocious highland charge, William’s men stayed in place and fired their guns and cannons. Few Jacobites made it across the field to the enemy and those who did break through the enemy’s lines were surrounded and killed. The Jacobites were badly beaten at Culloden and those who were left retreated to Inverness. William’s army followed them to Inverness and made life very miserable for everyone in that town. The Battle of Culloden marked the end the Jacobite uprising. About that time a new flower was introduced and supporters of William named the flower Sweet William. In return, there was a weed with a very bad smell that opponents renamed Stinking Billy. Here’s Flat Stanley on a Stinking Billy plant.

Stinking Billy weed

Stinking Billy weed

Orange and Purple, Googly-Eyed Fellow Travellers

Flat Stanley met some fellow travellers, Orange and Purple at Dunvegan Castle. Orange and Purple were accompanying this very nice couple on their honeymoon. Notice the giant plant leaves in the background.

Purple and Orange, a pair of googly-eyed fellow travellers with Flat Stanley

Purple and Orange, a pair of googly-eyed fellow travellers with Flat Stanley

2 Flat Tires and Flat Stanley near the end of the Scotland Visit

The Scotland Trip didn’t end as well as it began. It could have been much worse, though.flat tire and flat stanley

We were all deflated when I managed to blow the left front and the left back tires while only 18 miles from the end of the trip. I’d driven more than 1800 miles without incident but as a bus passed closely by on the right side, something on the road wrecked both tires on the left side. Fortunately, I was able to drive the car to the nearby Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. There was even a pay phone there, so it appeared help was on the way “within 60 minutes” according to the person at the tire service. But then the restaurant with the payphone closed and the repair truck hadn’t arrived.

rangers

Two hours later, there was still no sign of help but fortunately, Park Rangers Caroline and Beverley showed up. They were great! They let us use their mobile phone and kept us company for the next hour awaiting the tire service. They even drove some of our group into the next town. After several more calls, the repair truck finally arrived and the Volvo was hoisted onto the flatbed and driven into Balloch.

Austria and Hungary

Flat Stanley went to Vienna and Budapest for Christmas, 2003

Submitted by Dale Hubert

Austria

Flat Stanley really enjoyed flying Austrian Airlines.  The Flight Attendants were great!
Stanley’s clothing was almost a match for their uniforms.
Stanley was almost on the menu and he even got to sit in the cockpit
Flat Stanley met some knights.
The one on the left is a street performer from Vienna who pretends he’s a statue.
The ones on the right are real suits of armour in a museum.

Stanley enjoyed the statues.  They were as quiet as Stanley.
Flat Stanley went to the Museum of Musical Instruments.  He saw the violin that was played by Mozart’s father and many strange guitars.  The museum guards wouldn’t let Stanley touch anything, but they held him up for this picture.
No, this isn’t a giant Stanley on the roof, it’s a model of Saint Stephan’s Church in Vienna.

Flat Stanley visited a terrible place.  It was the Concentration Camp at Mauthausen, Austria.


He doesn’t feel like talking about it right now.  It was horrible.
Hungary
The first thing Flat Stanley noticed in Budapest
was how fast the escalators to the subway moved!
It’s the oldest subway system on the continent.

A lovely young Hungarian lady introduced Flat Stanley to her beautiful dolls.  It was love at first sight!
Stanley liked the hand-painted eggs, too.

The ancient statues in Budapest let Flat Stanley pose with them.

Even the police officers were very friendly.

There were statues all over Budapest.  The one on the left was made by the Russians.
It is not well-liked.
When the Russians were there they probably wouldn’t have liked Flat Stanley, either.

Now that the Russians are gone, Hungarians use their own parliament.
It is one of the most beautiful parliament buildings in the world.
Flat Stanley is on the staircase.

Bathurst Inlet, Nunavut

In July, 2006, Flat Stanley visited Bathurst Inlet, the smallest community in the newest Canadian Territory, Nunavut.

There are only 16 people living in Bathurst Inlet.

This is the community. It’s on the Arctic Ocean at Bathurst Inlet.

This is Stanley’s certificate from Bathurst Inlet Lodge

Flat Stanley found an artifact- an Inuit soapstone container.

Flat Stanley checked out a ground squirrel burrow, but no one was home.

Sam was an expert on Inuit tools.

Glenn was an RCMP officer. This is what he wore in the winter.

People still need furs in the far north.

Flat Stanley enjoyed watching the Inuit games of skill.

This was a traditional Inuit candle and stove. It got very hot!

What a lucky man Gary is! He found an Inuit arrowhead among the rocks on this beach.

Pudjuk took Flat Stanley rock sliding.

The northern lights have seen strange sights…

This is Martin.

Flat Stanley is in a kayak.

Flat Stanley found some amethysts! There were diamonds nearby, but he didn’t find any of those.

This dog’s fur coat was very thick, even in the summer. This is Esker.

Brrr! Even in July the Arctic waters are cold!

The Nunavut flag: Yellow for the midnight sun, white for snow, and an inukshuk.

Flat Stanley saw a caribou.

“I thought bears only did that in the forest!”

And here’s the grizzly bear who did it.

These stromatolite fossils are 2.7 billion years old!

Page Burt was an expert on everything. She made the whole trip worthwhile.

It really is the land of the midnight sun. I took this picture exactly at midnight.

In some places the only life seemed to be lichen.

Flat Stanley Project update

June 15, 2009

The Registration and the List of Participants are finally online and working fine. In only a few days we’re already up to 20 members on the List of Participants. The Bulletin Board is set up to help arrange exchanges, but the posts from previous years might not be recovered.

This should be a great year for the FS Project!

New Flat Stanley Picture Gallery blog

This Picture Gallery blog is a new feature to the Flat Stanley Project that allows participants to upload their own text and images. Up until this, I had to manually add each of the thousands of pictures that were sent to me, and I simply wasn’t able to find the time to continue doing that. This section is searchable, using the Categories selector to the right of this paragraph and also the Search window, so it should be easy to find the images that interest you. At first it’s a bit awkward to navigate a blog, so at any time you can click on the Flat Stanley Project Picture Gallery Blog title to be returned to this page. After creating your account you will have Contributor status, which means you will only have the ability to add text. This is a security feature, so that unauthorized people aren’t able to add inappropriate images. Those with Author status are able to upload pictures to support their text. Contact me if you would like to be an Author. Include some background information about yourself to support why you should be given Author status.

Dale Hubert with Flat Stanley

How to Add Text and Images

To make contributions, simply go to the Meta section in the margin to the left of this paragraph and use the Register link to create your account. A password will be e-mailed to you. You will have the status of Contributor. Then use Meta to Login. Select Site Admin then use the Posts section and click Add New (here highlighted in red).addnew

Adding Images

You must apply to be an Author to post images. Contributors may post text, but are not allowed to upload images. Send an e-mail to Dale Hubert requesting to be changed from Contributor to Author. Then, to add images to your posts, click on the rectangle with the frame around it that appears immediately to the right of upload-insertUpload/Insert (here highlighted in red). When the next window appears, click on Select Files. You can then select an image from your computer and the blog software will add it after you’ve selected Insert Into Post. Be sure to click on the Publish button to the right, or, if you’re editing an existing post, the Update Post button.

 

I’m looking forward to lots of great images and stories!

 

Dale Hubert