April 2019
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

St Piran’s Day March 2013

On 1 March 2013, St Piran arrived (again) in Perranporth.  Flat went to welcome him, along with the children form the local schools.  He had a great time dancing the Piran Furry Dance.  He was a bit disappointed that the photos weren’t very good, but hopes you get an idea of the dancing any way.

Flat learned that Piran is the most famous of all the saints said to have come to Cornwall from Ireland.  The heathen Irish tied him to a mill-stone, rolled it over the edge of a cliff into a stormy sea, which immediately became calm, and the saint floated safely over the water to land upon the sandy beach of Perranzabuloe in Cornwall.  He was joined at Perranzabuloe by many of his Christian converts and together they founded the Abbey of Lanpiran, with Piran as abbot.  Saint Piran ‘rediscovered’ tin-smelting (tin had been smelted in Cornwall since before the Romans’ arrival, but the methods had since been lost) when his black hearthstone, which was evidently a slab of tin-bearing ore, had the tin smelt out of it and rise to the top in the form of a white cross (thus the image on the flag).

St Piran’s Day is popular in Cornwall and the term ‘Perrantide’ has been coined to describe the week prior to this day. Many Cornish-themed events occur in the Duchy and also in areas in which there is a large community descended from Cornish emigrants. The village of Perranporth (‘Porthpyran’ in Cornish) hosts the annual inter-Celtic festival of ‘Lowender Peran’, which is also named in honour of him.  Flat was unable to attend the largest St Piran’s Day event – the march across the dunes to St Piran’s cross which thousands of people attending, generally dressed in black, white and gold, and carrying the Cornish Flag – maybe next year so he can take part in the play about the Life of St Piran, in Cornish. Daffodils are also carried and placed at the cross. Daffodils also feature in celebrations in Truro, most likely due to their ‘gold’ colour. Black, white and gold are colours associated with Cornwall due to St Piran’s Flag (black and white), and the Duchy Shield (gold coins on black).

How did Flat end his St Piran’s Day celebrations?  With a Cornish Pasty of course!

 

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.