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Flat Stanley Moves to Cornwall (England)

Cornwall has its own language! Cornish!

Cornish (Kernowek or Kernewek) is a Brythonic Celtic language and a recognised minority language of the United Kingdom. Along with Welsh and Breton, it is directly descended from the ancient British language spoken throughout much of Britain before the English language came to dominate. The language continued to function as a common community language in parts of Cornwall until the late 18th century. Some children used the language to converse in, and families used it as a language of the home through the 19th century and possibly into the 20th. Some elderly speakers were known to be still living into the 20th century including one still alive in 1914. A process to revive the language was started in the early 20th century, continuing to this day.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornish_language

Flat is going to enrol in some classes to learn the language (just like he learned a bit of Arabic while he was in Saudi Arabia).
This is what Flat has learned about Redruth, so far: Redruth as we see it today is almost wholly a product of the last 250 years. It owed its growth to its good fortune in lying at the centre of what was in the 1700s one of the richest parts of land in the world. It was the deep mining of copper after the 1730s, which catapulted Redruth out of its status of quiet market town – in reality a village. Formerly overshadowed by its neighbours of Truro, Helston and Falmouth, it became one of the major urban centres in Cornwall.
The history of the town has, therefore, three parts. First, there was a long period during which it was a small market town of less than a thousand souls; then from around 1700 to the 1850s the town grew rapidly to house a population of over 8,000 as mining prospered; and finally, from the 1860s, the chronic problems of local industry heralded a period in which the town searched for a new role. Within this framework perhaps the best way to get a feel for the past of Redruth and its people is to walk around its streets. http://www.redruth-tc.gov.uk/Core/Redruth-Town-Council/Pages/History_4.aspx
Redruth is twinned with Plumergat et Meriadec, Brittany, France and Mineral Point, Wisconsin, USA. A lot of Cornish miners emigrated to Wisconsin as the tin mining ran out in Cornwall.http://www.redruth-tc.gov.uk/Core/Redruth-Town-Council/Pages/Twinning_4.aspx 
Finally, the UK history of last name: Stanley
 stanley_large
This interesting surname is one of the oldest and noblest of all English surnames, with the Stanley family who hold the earldom of Derby tracing their descent from a companion of Wilham the Conqueror, Adam de Aldithley. A branch of the family taking the name Stanley when Adam’s grandson married the heiress to the manor of Stanley in Staffordshire. The name itself is of Anglo-Saxon locational origin from any of the various places so called in Derbyshire, Durham and Gloucester, and is composed of the Olde English pre 7th Century “stan”, a stone, plus “leah”, a wood or clearing. The founder of the family’s fortune was Sir John Stanley (1350 – 1414), who married an heiress of West Derby, Lancashire, and became Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and was granted sovereignty over the Isle of Man by Henry 1V. One Thomas Baron Stanley placed the Crown of England on the head of Henry Tudor (Henry V11) at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, and was created Earl of Derby. Other famous namebearers include Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby (1508 – 1572), who signed a petition to Pope Clement V11 for Henry V111’s divorce, 1530; and Arthur Penrhyn Stanley (1815 – 1881) who was Dean of Westminster from 1864 – 1881. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert de Stanleya, which was dated 1130, in the “Pipe Rolls of Staffordshire”, during the reign of King Henry 1, known as “The Administrator”, 1100 – 1135. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop ” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Stanley#ixzz22AwYRqFH

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